Technical FAQ

 

Wondering how UV-C light and UV-C Zap Band works? We have a lot of your answers here.*

*The sources referenced below are no way associated with UVC Zap Band LLC. They are purely used for reference and to back the science used to invent the UV-C Zap Band.

 

Q: Does UV-C light kill the Coronavirus?

A: Yes! According to research, UV-C light has been shown to kill SARS, MERS and the flu viruses. 

  • Source: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

  • COVID-19 infections can be caused by contact with contaminated surfaces and then touching facial areas (less common than person-to-person, but still an issue)[vi]. Minimizing this risk is key because COVID-19 virus can live on plastic and steel surfaces for up to 3 days[vii]. Normal cleaning and disinfection may leave behind some residual contamination, which UVC can treat suggesting that a multiple disinfectant approach is prudent. UVC has been shown to achieve a high level of inactivation of a near-relative of COVID-19’s virus (i.e., SARS-CoV-1, tested with an adequate dose of 254nm UV while suspended in liquid)[viii]. 

 

Q: Is UV-C light accepted by the medical community? 

A: Yes! The CDC, on its own website, has explained the effectiveness of UVC light. 

  • Source 1: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Ultraviolet Radiation (UV) - The wavelength of UV radiation ranges from 328 nm to 210 nm (3280 A to 2100 A). Its maximum bactericidal effect occurs at 240–280 nm. Mercury vapor lamps emit more than 90% of their radiation at 253.7 nm, which is near the maximum microbicidal activity 775. Inactivation of microorganisms results from destruction of nucleic acid through induction of thymine dimers. UV radiation has been employed in the disinfection of drinking water 776, air 775, titanium implants 777, and contact lenses778. Bacteria and viruses are more easily killed by UV light than are bacterial spores 775. UV radiation has several potential applications, but unfortunately its germicidal effectiveness and use is influenced by organic matter; wavelength; type of suspension; temperature; type of microorganism; and UV intensity, which is affected by distance and dirty tubes779. The application of UV radiation in the health-care environment (i.e., operating rooms, isolation rooms, and biologic safety cabinets) is limited to destruction of airborne organisms or inactivation of microorganisms on surfaces. The effect of UV radiation on postoperative wound infections was investigated in a double-blind, randomized study in five university medical centers. After following 14,854 patients over a 2-year period, the investigators reported the overall wound infection rate was unaffected by UV radiation, although postoperative infection in the “refined clean” surgical procedures decreased significantly (3.8%–2.9%) 780. No data support the use of UV lamps in isolation rooms, and this practice has caused at least one epidemic of UV-induced skin erythema and keratoconjunctivitis in hospital patients and visitors 781.

 

 

Q: Are UV-C lights used to disinfect objects and surfaces in other industries? 

A: Yes! Besides being used in hospitals, UV-C light is being used to disinfect laboratory equipment, airplanes, buses, trains, and even water. 

 

Q: Can I use UV-C light on my skin? 

A: NO! UV-C light should ONLY be used on surfaces. It should not be used on humans or pets. 

  • More info: Biological Effect of UV Light

    • While UVB radiation is widely recognized for its harmful effects on human skin and links to skin cancer, each of the UV bands (UVA, UVB and UVC) create different risks for humans.

    • UVC radiation refers to wavelengths shorter than 280 nm. These wavelengths are entirely absorbed by our atmosphere and no natural UVC radiation reaches the surface of the earth. These wavelengths are available to us through artificial sources, such as UV-C LEDs or mercury lamps. The intensity from point sources like UVC LEDs falls off as 1 over distance squared, and once it gets past the scattering length, it falls off exponentially. This means that 1) the further away the UVC source from a human, the lesser dose he is exposed to, and 2) the absorption length of UVC radiation in human skin is extremely short so that almost no UVC radiation can reach the living cells in the skin; all the absorption occurs in the dead cell layers.

 

Q: Can UV-C light damage my eyes? 

A: YES! It will damage the eyes with direct and close exposure. You should NEVER look directly at the UVC light. The light is intended to be used on surfaces to kill germs pointed away from your eyes and skin. 

  • Note the fact that the light is an arms length away also decreases its potential for harm since UVC light significantly weakens with distance. The intensity from point sources like UVC LEDs falls off as 1 over distance squared, and once it gets past the scattering length, it falls off exponentially. This means that 1) the further away the UVC source from a human, the lesser dose he is exposed to, and 2) the absorption length of UVC radiation in human skin is extremely short so that almost no UVC radiation can reach the living cells in the skin; all the absorption occurs in the dead cell layers.

  • In rare instances of prolonged direct exposure to UVC light, temporary eye and skin damage has been exhibited, such as cornea injury (sometimes referred to as “welder’s eye”) although this generally heals after a couple of days. 

 

Q: What is Ultraviolet C (UV-C)?

A: The entire UV spectrum can kill or inactivate many microorganism species, preventing them from replicating. UVC energy at 253.7 nanometers provides the most germicidal effect. The application of UV-C energy to inactivate microorganisms is also known as Germicidal Irradiation or UVGI.

Ultraviolet C

  • UVC exposure inactivates microbial organisms such as bacteria and viruses by altering the structure and the molecular bonds of their DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid). DNA is a “blue print” these organisms use to develop, function and reproduce. By destroying the organism’s ability to reproduce, it becomes harmless since it cannot colonize. After UVC exposure, the organism dies off leaving no offspring, and the population of the microorganism diminishes rapidly.

  • Ultraviolet germicidal lamps provide a much more powerful and concentrated effect of ultraviolet energy than can be found naturally. Germicidal UV provides a highly effective method of destroying microorganisms.

 

Q: Is all UV light the same? 

A: No, they are not all the same.

  • Ultra-Violet (UV) light is invisible to the human eye and is divided into UV-A, UV-B and UV-C. UV-C is found within 200-280 nm range. UV-C Zap Band has embedded a UV-C ultraviolet light (265-280nm). UV-C Zap Band light is focused in this spectrum which is effective against viruses and bacteria. Microorganisms effective resistance to UV light varies considerably. Moreover, the environment of the particular microorganism greatly influences the radiation dose needed for its destruction

  • Don’t take our word for it. What are others saying about UV-C light?





Q: Where do we get most of our UV light on earth?

A: The sun is the greatest source of UV light. The sun emits ultraviolet light in both near UV and vacuum UV wavelengths, but because of absorption in the atmosphere's ozone layer, 99% of the ultraviolet light that reaches the Earth's surface is 315-380nm (UV-A). So UV-C light does not make it past the ozone layer.

 

Q: What else can UV-C light disinfect? 

A: UV-C light kills most germs. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are all susceptible to UV-C light. 

 

Q: How long has UV-C light been around? 

A: Almost 150 years!

  • In 1878, Arthur Downes and Thomas P. Blunt published a paper describing the sterilization of bacteria exposed to short-wavelength light. UV has been a known mutagen at the cellular level for over 100 years. The 1903 Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded to Niels Finsen for his use of UV against lupus vulgaris, tuberculosis of the skin. Using UV light for disinfection of drinking water dates back to 1910 in Marseille, France. The prototype plant was shut down after a short time due to poor reliability. In 1955, UV water treatment systems were applied in Austria and Switzerland; by 1985 about 1,500 plants were employed in Europe. In 1998 it was discovered that protozoa such as cryptosporidium and giardia were more vulnerable to UV light than previously thought; this opened the way to wide-scale use of UV water treatment in North America. By 2001, over 6,000 UV water treatment plants were operating in Europe.